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Student sound: What students do to hear their music

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Published: Friday, March 1, 2013

Updated: Friday, March 1, 2013 02:03


Music is what gets us through a walk across campus, studying at the library or the end of a long week. With applications like Pandora, Spotify and Songza, more and more people listen, share and create personal playlists that can match any situation.

Music plays a huge part in the average student’s life, whether it’s on their way to class or taking a walk downtown to the ATM. It’s very common to see a student with their headphones in, blaring songs. It seems that because the majority prefers a portable form of music, applications will continue to rise in popularity
“I usually use my iPod from time to time, but lately Pandora has been offering me more variety than the music I have on my iPod,” explained Jamal Jones, a UNH junior, while studying in the Union Court. For Jones, music is the only thing that keeps his focus, and using Pandora allows him to select a playlist based on his favorite artist.

Pandora is a free Internet service that plays musical selections of a certain genre based on the user’s artist selection. The user then provides positive or negative feedback for songs chosen by the service, which are taken into account when Pandora selects future songs.

Pandora has become the easiest source of music – it’s as simple as one click of a button to download and create an account. As opposed to buying music on iTunes for $1.29, one can listen to music for free on Pandora.

Sophomore Jessica Olinger said she felt that using Pandora prevented her from spending money on iTunes.

“I use Pandora almost every day, and once I like a track I’m guaranteed that I will hear it again; it’s like listening to my iPod on shuffle. Too bad I don’t have any current music,” Olinger said.

Founded in 2000, Pandora hasn’t been around for too long but has grown quickly. Its rapid popularity isn’t for every student on campus, though.

Rob Wilson, a UNH senior, is not a fan of Pandora. He said that he would only use Pandora at times when he needs to update his iPod, because he prefers iTunes to Pandora.

“I’m not really fond of things like Pandora. I feel like I’m limiting my variety of music because I can pick an artist and hardly hear that artist’s music again,” Wilson said. “I’d rather buy my CDs and use my iPod.”
Over the years, the service of the music industry has changed dramatically, from vinyl to cassettes, to CDs and mp3s. As companies compete and strive to adopt the best new source of audio listening that will be the next big thing tomorrow, consumers are responding to this corporate strategy just as fast.

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